World Affairs

The issue behind our issues

Many commentators nowadays rely on a narrative in which weak productivity growth, populism, and a rising China are threatening the very survival of Western liberal democracy. Yet most of the commonly identified causes of Western discontent are in fact symptoms of a deeper intellectual breakdown

Four collision courses for the global economy

Between US President Donald Trump’s zero-sum disputes with China and Iran, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s brinkmanship with Parliament and the European Union, and Argentina’s likely return to Peronist populism, the fate of the global economy is balancing on a knife edge.

The impeachment trap

America’s Democrats have made a serious mistake by launching impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. They are replaying the Republican impeachment of Bill Clinton in 1998

Trump’s North Korean road to nowhere

Less than a year after his unprecedented face-to-face meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, US President Donald Trump is planning to hold another summit to discuss denuclearization.

Brexit: Sweat and Tears

For years after World War II, Britons were aware of the palpable shift in the country’s fortunes. But there was a deep aversion to accepting the UK’s diminished status, and the failure – beginning with Winston Churchill – of successive generations of politicians to address it is what has led to the current impasse.

A solution to the Us-China trade dispute

The advanced economies are right that China needs to take steps to redress unfairness in its trade relations with other countries, not to mention its own economy.

When will China achieve quality growth?

China has not yet realized President Xi Jinping’s vision of an inclusive, green, innovation-driven economy. But if policymakers continue to strengthen property rights and work to improve market confi dence and foster fair competition, a breakthrough should not be far off.

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